Tag Archives: odd news

Are You Sure Mermaids Aren’t Real?

Today is a blogging milestone for me: This is my 100th post. I’m not sure anyone is as shocked as I am. I tried to think of a great way to celebrate. Of course, I’m revisiting one of my favorite topics: Mermaids!

Come celebrate at my new website. You can read the latest post about mermaid sightings. Sign up so you don’t miss any future posts, too.

Are You Sure Mermaids Aren’t Real?

Life-size self portrait of me as a mermaid

Life-size self portrait of me as a mermaid

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Because Cockroaches Aren’t Strong Enough?

It’s been awhile since I’ve done a TINSTAAFL Tuesday.  I know it’s not Tuesday, but this is definitely TINSTAAFL (“There is no such thing as a free lunch”) worthy. In fact, I’m changing the category while I make blog adjustments.

From Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain USDA image)

From Wikimedia Commons (Public Domain USDA image)
Click image to go to source.

Cockroaches are gross. There I said it. I grew up in the Houston area where the cockroaches grow as large as small puppies.

When I was six or seven, I was waiting on the school sidewalk for my mom to pick me up. I was wearing sandals, and something tickled my foot. I ignored it for a second. Then I used my other foot to scratch the itch. It still itched. I looked down to see a ginormous roach on my practically-bare foot. I screamed and kicked my feet and danced around like the cowboy who has someone shooting at his feet in a Wild West movie.

*shiver*

What if you were in a disaster and your only hope for being rescued was a cyborg Madagascar hissing cockroach?  How about a cockroach with its own fuel cell?

Did I mention that I can’t stand these insects? I hope I’m not offending anyone out there who might love them.

*bleh*

Back to the disaster…

You’re trapped in a destroyed building. That’s pretty stressful (I know, understatement!). Then a cyborg cockroach runs toward you. I don’t know about you, but I might be tempted to smash it before I realized that it had some kind of technology attached to it, squishing my one chance of survival.  I hope I have something nearby to cover up the cockroach carnage so that I don’t have to look at it while I remain trapped.

*gag*

To keep things interesting, check out this article about cyborg flying insects.  The circuitry is implanted in the insect pupae and the adult moth’s flight can be controlled for military or security use.  The pictures and diagrams are fascinating. Evidently, this technology was inspired by a science fiction novel called Sparrowhark by Thomas A. Easton. I haven’t read it, but this is a clear case of science fiction intersecting with or inspiring current science.

While the bugs don’t seem to be harmed (beyond having someone control them), I just have to wonder if it is really necessary to make a practically-indestructible insect even more powerful.  They will outlive us all. Do we have to give them help?

Do the benefits outway the risks?  What kinds of things can you see go wrong with this kind of technology mixed with insects?  How would you react if a cyborg insect (crawling or flying) approached you in a disaster situation or any situation?

When Distant Relatives Visit

It’s the holiday season, and people visit family and friends.  How do you prepare for those…uh, distant relatives who come to visit?  You know the ones I’m talking about.  They are difficult to accommodate and have strange eating habits.  Don’t even think about the Neanderthal-like hygiene practices. *shiver*

Where are these nine-feet (or taller, even) cousins going to sleep?

I think I’ll rig up an extra large hammock between the trees in the backyard.  No, that won’t work because the winter seedlings are slowly working their way up.  I wouldn’t want our guest to step in the garden.  Maybe, we’ll have to borrow a huge tent.

If the thought of preparing meals for the crowd everyday starts to overwhelm, we can think about the edibles we have growing outside.  I don’t mean the seedlings and baby broccoli which barely survived housing the offspring of negligent, flighty parents.  (They could’ve at least waited for the caterpillars to hatch before they flew away somewhere to whatever it is butterflies do after they lay eggs on baby broccoli.)

No, these guests require a special diet.  They don’t like any processed foods–everything must be natural.  It’s a good thing that our yard has a variety of dandelions and clover.  The neighborhood has lots of wild rabbits, too–our newest family members will feel right at home.

(Note to self: Warn the neighbors to bring in their cats.)

Put out the best towels.  On second thought, hide the best towels and put out all the old ones, even the ones that we use to dry off the dogs.

(Note to self: Board the dogs at a kennel for the weekend.)

So who are Cousins George, Bob, and Fred that I fear for my furry kids’ lives?

Bigfoot.

If they are anything like Harry from Harry and the Hendersons, then I’d worry more about my house.

What a great holiday card!

What a great holiday card!

These are the mythological creatures of forest wildernesses.  They are our close relatives.

Their DNA proves it. Yep.  Some scientists in Texas have sequenced the DNA of bigfoot. Their findings are controversial though.  (Ya think?)   They claim human females cross-bred with unknown primates.  Some 15,000 years later, those descendants should have human rights.

Hmmm…  Well, it seems we will have to wait for more conclusive evidence and test results before we need to give Fred, Bob, and George voting rights or a place at the holiday dinner table.

Their cousins from Everest are getting a lot of attention, too.  It seems the Sasquatch is mighty elusive.

For other interesting ideas, go check out what Debra Kristi says about Bigfoot at her blog.  There are other interesting links to read, too.

I’d love to see mermaids in real life, too–maybe from a distance.  Oh, wait!  Mermaids are half human.  Does that mean….

Nevermind.

What do you think about Bigfoot, Sasquatch, and Yeti stories? Are they close relatives, stuff made of myth, or seriously clever creatures?

What were they thinking?

Every once in awhile I come across these gems of crazy things people do.  Sometimes I have to share because, well, I can’t make these things up!

Let’s Go for a Swim

This one is from earlier this summer, but it’s too good not to include it.

An English man vacationing in France got very excited about the Summer Olympics swimming competitions.  It’s not uncommon for people who are enthustiastic about a sport to participate.  Perhaps they have dreams of joining an Olympic team in the future.  Perhaps they just have fun doing the sport.  Perhaps they need assistance when they decide to swim from the south of France to the United States.

Spontaneously.  No planning.  No thought of the actual distance across the Atlantic Ocean.  I don’t care how good a swimmer he thought he was.  Did he really think he could swim 3,594.69 miles across the Atlantic Ocean?  He survived and was towed back to shore from a dingy.  How appropriate.

Let’s Go Feed the Tigers

That tiger sure was bigger than I thought!

A trip to the zoo is always fun.  You can look at the animals, watch them get fed, and ride a train that travels around the exhibits.  Or, you can do all of those things with the added adventure of jumping from the moving zoo train into the tiger exhibit where you can feed the tiger yourself.  No, wait, do not try that last one.

The Bronx Zoo zookeepers used fire extinguishers to get the tiger to leave his lunch the mauled man alone.  The man survived and was in stable condition when the news story was released.  What was he thinking (the report doesn’t say)?  The poor tiger is probably traumatized now.  I’m glad they didn’t have to hurt the tiger.

Let’s Take a Ride

A man was caught trying to sneak into Spain with help from two other men.  People have tried numerous things to smuggle themselves into other countries.  This one chose to ride as the passenger seat.  Yes, you read that right — as the passenger seat.

They took the seat apart until there was only the frame.  The man sat inside the frame with the upholstery as a disguise.  One of the smugglers sat on him as if he were a real carseat.  A border guard happened to touch skin instead of fabric when he put his hand on the seat.  No word on what the seatman’s thoughts were other than, “We would have gotten away with it if it weren’t for those meddling kids.”   He might have thought it.

The man should have saved the carseat disguise for Halloween instead of a border crossing.  I hope his seat buddy wasn’t too heavy. I’m sure there’s another joke in there somewhere…

What do you think about these crazy stunts?  Do you have any jokes to add?  Have you seen other crazy stuff and wondered, “What were they thinking?”  Do share.  🙂

We figured that one out a long time ago

I have a whale bone to pick with the world of history as written by men in relation to what women were capable of doing, knowing, or creating–especially when it’s about clothes.

Historically, men have made life-changing decisions for women and declared that’s how women must carry forward–as if men actually knew anything about what goes on in women’s minds or bodies.  (Pantyhose is a perfect example.)

A recent discovery of a medieval bra has overthrown the long-held belief that the bra was invented only about 100 years ago.

Really?  Just because there hasn’t been material evidence of bras before the torture device called a corset, people can’t fathom the idea that women might have been smart enough to sew fabric in such a way as to support their breasts comfortably?  Thank goodness the Victorian Age is over!

by Steph Lawton from WANA Commons

Mary Phelps Jacob got the first patent for a bra in 1913 when she sewed two silk hankies together to wear under a new evening gown.  I can’t blame her for wanting to pitch her stiff, tight, and uncomfortable corset.  But that doesn’t mean she invented the brassiere for the first time ever in all of history.  Sheesh.

Who did most (if not all) of the sewing for, well, forever?  Women have be designing, creating, and burning their own undergarments for eternity.  Wait, did I say burning?OK, that part isn’t true.  In 1968, the myth of the bra-burning feminists was born at a draft protest.  Even though it didn’t happen, the myth was perpetuated enough so that some women felt free enough to leave their bras at home.  (Some really shouldn’t haveI could be a little jealous; others didn’t look any different.)

Honestly, there are so many bra options on the market now that women can wear anything from the barely-there sheer to the push-up bra.   Don’t forget the all-in-one SPANX so no one sees the muffin top at the too-low waistline of our jeans.

Oh, no!  We’re back to the torture devices again!

Women, have we learned nothing since the corset was thrown out?

In honor of the sometimes-matching partner to the brassiere, check out what Jenny Hansen has to say about the national day for underwear.

Just for fun–Answer this quiz to tell me your favorite.  🙂

Do you have a least favorite article of clothing?  I’d love to hear from you.

Mermaids aren’t real?

I had a different idea for my first post, but then I heard about the announcement that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration made recently that “No evidence of aquatic humanoids has ever been found.

Really?  All this because Animal Planet ran a science fiction episode about what if mermaids were an evolutionary possibility?  You can see their press release information for yourself.

I haven’t seen the show, but there were some viewers who thought the information was believable enough to contact NOAA to ask for proof.  NOAA’s brief announcement was wise to point out the obvious that the question of the mythological creature won’t be answered by them.

No worries.  Mer-mythology is still safe. 

As a kid, I played mermaid games in the pool with my siblings and cousins.  We kicked our legs together and pushed ourselves through the water.  It was hard work keeping my feet in line and legs bending just right to get the best mermaid movement through the water.  Aquaman had it easier and could communicate with sea creatures.  I wanted that gift.

As an art major (very briefly) in college, I had to do a full-sized self portrait.  I made myself a mermaid.

This is where my 14-year-old appropriates a quote from a Harry Potter character: “Are you sure that’s a real mermaid?  Well, it’s not very good, is it?” (You can see why I changed my major.)

News alert: Diana Beebe is not a mermaid and never was a mermaid.  This is only a photograph of an art assignment, not of a mermaid. No calls to NOAA or any other agency to check, please.

Does that mean mermaids aren’t real?

Even though archeological, biological, zoological, or any other  -logical evidence doesn’t exist, the fascination and love of mermaids exists worldwide.   It would take pages to list all the movies, books, and TV shows that include merpeople.

A friend of mine writes a blog about all things mer, including many people who have their own tails and spend their time working to protect our world’s oceans.  Check out Cynthia’s blog and then tell me mermaids aren’t real.

I imagine that those people who contacted NOAA for answers after watching an episode of science theory feel a little bit silly chasing a red herring (sorry, couldn’t resist at least one pun).

What mythological creature would you love to see found, or not?  Why, or why not?  I’d love to hear what you think.  Leave a comment below.

Following and sharing are welcome, too.  😉